• Opening America’s Archives: Using Primary Sources in the Classroom

    This month, Georgia Historical Society’s Education Coordinator Sophia Sineath presented two one-day workshops hosted by the Okefenokee RESA and Middle Georgia RESA. Both hosting institutions are part of Georgia’s Regional Educational Service Agency (RESA) which is comprised of 16 regional educational service agencies strategically located in service districts throughout the State of Georgia. The agencies […]

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  • Today in Georgia History: CNN

    In keeping with this month’s theme, we are featuring some Today in Georgia History segments on the history of business in Georgia. Detractors called it the Chicken Noodle Network and a waste of time, but it revolutionized the way the world gets its news. Ted Turner launched the Cable News Network—CNN—in Atlanta as the world’s […]

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  • Today in Georgia History: Home Depot

    In keeping with this month’s theme, we are featuring some Today in Georgia History segments on the history of business in Georgia. Getting the stuff to do it yourself got a lot easier on June 22, 1979 when the first two Home Depots opened. Those first stores have grown to more than 2,200 locations and revolutionized the […]

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  • Today in Georgia History: Alonzo Herndon

    In keeping with this month’s theme, we are featuring some Today in Georgia History segments on the history of business in Georgia. He began life as a slave but, at 47, Alonzo Herndon started the Atlanta Life Insurance Company that became and remains one of America’s most successful black-owned businesses, a testament to the enterprising spirit of […]

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  • The Steam Ship Savannah: Marvel or Monster?

    By Brittany Mayo, Reference Assistant June 17, 1819: Spotted off the coast of Ireland, a ship was billowing smoke. Immediately identified as a vessel in distress, aid was dispatched. Impossibly fast for a ship on fire, the ship evaded its rescuers, leaving them no choice but to fire several shots in an attempt to grab […]

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  • It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s Georgia’s Famous Batson Aero Yacht!

    By Allison Dillard, Reference Services Coordinator Imagine being able to make your dream of building a giant flying boat into a reality. In 1912, retired Army captain, William A. Batson, traveled from Illinois to Savannah, Georgia and did just that. Well, almost. Batson Air Navigation Company began setting up its Dutch Island manufacturing facility in […]

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  • Juliette Gordon Low: The First Girl Scout

    By Rachael Zipperer A Georgian began what would become the largest voluntary organization for women and girls in the United States. Inspired by Sir Robert Baden-Powell’s Boy Scouts and Girl Guides in Britain, Juliette Gordon Low founded the American Girl Guides (later renamed the Girl Scouts) in 1912. Low’s correspondence with Baden-Powell and others (housed […]

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  • Three Governors Controversy

    Three Governors Controversy

    Happy Election Day! If you think the current election gets the prize for most unusual or controversial, consider Georgia’s gubernatorial situation in 1947. Did you know that for a brief period of time, Georgia had three governors? Cast your vote, then learn about this controversy­­—including unexpected death, changing locks, and fistfights in the governor’s office—on […]

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  • Georgia Female College

    College Days and Soldier Serenades

    By Allison Dillard, Reference Services Coordinator At first of its kind in so many respects, Georgia Female College in Macon, Georgia was officially chartered in 1836 becoming the oldest degree granting women’s college in the world. The school’s name changed to Wesleyan Female College in 1843 and later, finally, to Wesleyan College, but the mission […]

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  • Crawford Williamson Long

    By Rachael Zipperer At a party, Crawford Williamson Long was struck with the idea for an innovation without which modern surgical practices would be unimaginable. An attendee of “ether frolics” where sulphuric ether was inhaled recreationally for its intoxicating effects, Long noticed that those under the influence seemed to feel no pain from the bumps […]

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