• chieftains

    Marker Monday: Chieftains

    In honor of the 2016-2017 Georgia History Festival, “A State of Innovation,” the November #MarkerMonday posts will focus on Sequoyah, the creation of the Cherokee alphabet, and the Cherokee Nation. Over the course of the month, these posts will discuss Sequoyah, his efforts to create a written alphabet for the Cherokee Nation, and the forced removal […]

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  • cherokee-nation

    Marker Monday: Cherokee Nation

    In honor of the 2016-2017 Georgia History Festival, “A State of Innovation,” the November #MarkerMonday posts will focus on Sequoyah, the creation of the Cherokee alphabet, and the Cherokee Nation. Over the course of the month, these posts will discuss Sequoyah, his efforts to create a written alphabet for the Cherokee Nation, and the forced […]

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  • Marker Monday: New Echota: Cherokee National Capital

    In honor of the 2016-2017 Georgia History Festival, “A State of Innovation,” the November #MarkerMonday posts will focus on Sequoyah, the creation of the Cherokee alphabet, and the Cherokee Nation. Over the course of the month, these posts will discuss Sequoyah, his efforts to create a written alphabet for the Cherokee Nation, and the forced […]

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  • oakland-cemetery

    Marker Monday: Oakland Cemetery

    In honor of the 2016-2017 Georgia History Festival, “A State of Innovation,” the October #MarkerMonday posts will focus on the research used to make markers possible as part of Archives Month. Over the course of the month, these posts will talk about examples of how newer research informs and even changes our understanding of places, […]

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  • Marker Monday: Hidden Histories

    In honor of the 2016-2017 Georgia History Festival, “A State of Innovation,” the October #MarkerMonday posts will focus on the research used to make markers possible as part of Archives Month. Over the course of the month, these posts will talk about examples of how newer research informs and even changes our understanding of places, […]

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  • Hernando de Soto in Georgia

    Marker Monday: Hernando de Soto in Georgia

    This week’s #MarkerMonday examines Hernando de Soto and his travels throughout North America. Historians have long debated the exact route de Soto and his men took on their journey throughout North America. Of the four surviving documents that detail their expedition, none provide consistent descriptions of locations or distances. The Final Report of the United […]

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  • soybean-marker

    Marker Monday: Introduction of Soybeans to North America

    In honor of the 2016-2017 Georgia History Festival, “A State of Innovation,” the October #MarkerMonday posts will focus on the research used to make markers possible as part of Archives Month. Over the course of the month, these posts will talk about examples of how newer research informs and even changes our understanding of places, […]

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  • Point Peter Battery

    Marker Monday: Point Peter Battery and the War of 1812

    In honor of the 2016-2017 Georgia History Festival, “A State of Innovation,” the October #MarkerMonday posts will focus on the research used to make markers possible as part of Archives Month. Over the course of the month, these posts will talk about examples of how newer research informs and even changes our understanding of places, […]

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  • Marker Monday: Tomo-Chi-Chi’s Grave

    This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights Oglethorpe’s unique friendship with the chief of the Yamacraw Indians, Tomochichi. Tomochichi’s friendship was indispensable to the establishment of the Colony as a military outpost against Spanish invasion. While little is known about his youth, in about 1728, Tomochichi established the Yamacraw Tribe. The tribe formed from disbanded members of Creek […]

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  • Marker Monday: The Trustees’ Garden

    This week’s #MarkerMonday addresses one of James Edward Oglethorpe’s innovative ideas for the City of Savannah, the Trustees Garden. Shortly after establishing the colony of Georgia, Oglethorpe used ten acres of land east of the settlement to create the Trustees Garden. Belonging to the Trustees of the colony, the garden was modeled after medicinal and […]

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