• Point Peter Battery

    Marker Monday: Point Peter Battery and the War of 1812

    In honor of the 2016-2017 Georgia History Festival, “A State of Innovation,” the October #MarkerMonday posts will focus on the research used to make markers possible as part of Archives Month. Over the course of the month, these posts will talk about examples of how newer research informs and even changes our understanding of places, […]

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  • Marker Monday: Tomo-Chi-Chi’s Grave

    This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights Oglethorpe’s unique friendship with the chief of the Yamacraw Indians, Tomochichi. Tomochichi’s friendship was indispensable to the establishment of the Colony as a military outpost against Spanish invasion. While little is known about his youth, in about 1728, Tomochichi established the Yamacraw Tribe. The tribe formed from disbanded members of Creek […]

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  • Marker Monday: The Trustees’ Garden

    This week’s #MarkerMonday addresses one of James Edward Oglethorpe’s innovative ideas for the City of Savannah, the Trustees Garden. Shortly after establishing the colony of Georgia, Oglethorpe used ten acres of land east of the settlement to create the Trustees Garden. Belonging to the Trustees of the colony, the garden was modeled after medicinal and […]

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  • Marker Monday: The Landing of Oglethorpe and the Colonists

    In honor of the 2016-2017 Georgia History Festival, “A State of Innovation,” the September #MarkerMonday posts will focus on Georgia historical markers that tell the story of James Edward Oglethorpe and the founding of the colony of Georgia. Over the course of the month, these posts will delve into General Oglethorpe and his innovative approach […]

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  • Marker Monday: James Edward Oglethorpe

    In honor of the 2016-2017 Georgia History Festival, “A State of Innovation,” the September #MarkerMonday posts will focus on Georgia historical markers that tell the story of James Edward Oglethorpe and the founding of the colony of Georgia. Over the course of the month, these posts will delve into General Oglethorpe and his innovative approach […]

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  • Marker Monday: Birthplace of Augusta Chronicle

    This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights the history of the Augusta Chronicle. On August 30, 1785, Greenburg Hughes published Augusta’s first newspaper, the Augusta Gazette, the forerunner to what became the Augusta Chronicle. When Hughes moved to Charleston, South Carolina, the newspaper continued under John Erdman Smith as the Georgia State Gazette or Independent Register. After changing […]

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  • Pulitzer Prize Winner Caroline Pafford Miller

    Marker Monday: Caroline Pafford Miller

    This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights a Georgia novelist awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Literature, Caroline Pafford Miller. Born on August 26, 1903, in Waycross, Miller spent many of her formative years in South Georgia. After graduating from high school, she married her English teacher and moved to Baxley, Georgia. While in Baxley, Miller drew inspiration for […]

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  • Marker Monday: Paul Anderson

    This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights the life and legacy of professional strongman Paul Anderson. Born in Toccoa, Georgia, Anderson overcame Bright’s disease, a chronic inflammation of the kidneys, as a child. He attended Furman University on a football scholarship but resigned during the first year to focus on weightlifting. In 1955, he traveled as a goodwill […]

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  • Marker Monday: Oliver Norvell Hardy, Genius of Comedy

    This week’s #MarkerMonday pays tribute to Oliver Norvell Hardy, of Laurel and Hardy.  Hardy was born in January 1892 in Harlem, Georgia, andGrowing up, Hardy developed a love for singing and performed in local theatres. In 1917, Hardy made the decision to pursue his film career in California. Hardy signed with Hal Roach Studios in […]

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  • Marker Monday: Conrad Aiken

    This week’s #MarkerMonday explores the life of acclaimed writer and Savannah native, Conrad Aiken.  Aiken was born in Savannah on August 5, 1889. Following the tragic deaths of his parents when Aiken was 11 years-old, he moved to New England to live with his aunt. Aiken went on to attend Harvard where he met T.S. […]

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