Georgia Historical Society Announces the Creation of the Dr. William T. Moore Distinguished Editorship of the Georgia Historical Quarterly

Atlanta, Ga., January 24, 2017 – The Georgia Historical Society announced the creation of the Dr. William T. Moore Distinguished Editorship of the Georgia Historical Quarterly. The new position was created by a gift to the Society from Dr. William T. and Linda Moore. Dr. Glenn McNair, Editor of the Quarterly, will be the first to hold the position of Distinguished Editor.

“Now in its 100th year, the GHQ has been instrumental in providing Georgians with a greater understanding of our common history, and it continues to play a prominent role in fulfilling GHS’s mission as an educational and research institution,” said Dr. W. Todd Groce, President  and CEO of the Georgia Historical Society. “Ted’s long and distinguished academic career and love of history made this an exceptional fit, and we are proud to name the editorship in his honor.”

First published in March 1917, the GHQ has remained one of the premier state historical journals in the United States. The Quarterly features the finest scholarly articles on Georgia history, book reviews covering all aspects of southern and Georgia history, edited primary sources, oral histories, and essays by and about contemporary history makers. In 1999 the GHQ was recognized by the Governor of Georgia with a Governor’s Award in the Humanities.

Dr. William T. (Ted) Moore is retired from the University of South Carolina (USC) as Distinguished Professor Emeritus.  He earned a Ph.D. in finance and statistics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 1982, joined the faculty at Indiana University in that year, and moved to the University of South Carolina in 1986. There he served on the faculty and in various administrative posts, including Vice President for Planning, Executive Vice President and Provost, and Vice President for Finance and Chief Financial Officer at USC, overseeing an annual budget of $1.1 billion. Dr. Moore is an authority on capital investment analysis and has published 75 scholarly articles, a book and a monograph on financial topics. He served as executive editor of the Journal of Financial Research for six years and received numerous awards for research and teaching. Prior to entering the academy, he served on active duty in the U.S. Army as an infantry officer and is a decorated, twice-wounded, combat veteran of the Vietnam War. Dr. Moore’s wife Linda T. Moore is an attorney who served as director of legal affairs at the USC School of Medicine. They now live in Savannah where both are active in civic and philanthropic activities.

Dr. Glenn McNair is an associate professor of history and chair of the history department at Kenyon College in Ohio. He received his Bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Savannah State University in 1988. He received a Master’s degree in history from Georgia College & State University in 1996, and he went on to earn a Ph.D. in American history at Emory University in 2001. He has published in scholarly journals on various aspects of the African-American experience, with a particular emphasis on slavery, and is the author of Criminal Injustice: Slaves and Free Blacks in Georgia’s Criminal Justice System. His current research focuses on black political culture since the Civil Rights era. His research on slaves, criminal justice, race, and politics has appeared in local and national newspapers, and he comments regularly in print and online media on contemporary racial issues. Before becoming an academic, Dr. McNair was a police officer in Savannah, Ga., his hometown, and a special agent with the U.S. Treasury Department, where he served on the Secret Service protective detail of President Bill Clinton.


ABOUT GEORGIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Georgia Historical Society (GHS) is the premier independent statewide institution responsible for collecting, examining, and teaching Georgia history. GHS houses the oldest and most distinguished collection of materials related exclusively to Georgia history in the nation.
To learn more visit georgiahistory.com.

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