Georgia Historical Society to Dedicate New Historical Marker for Architect Edward Vason Jones

Albany, Ga., April 23, 2018– The Georgia Historical Society will dedicate a new historical marker on Tuesday, April 24, at 5:00 p.m., for renowned architect Edward Vason Jones. A native of Albany, Georgia, Jones designed and oversaw projects ranging from the renovation of the Mississippi Governor’s Mansion to restorations at the U.S. Department of State, and the White House. The historical marker is sponsored by Georgia Historical Society, The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Georgia – Albany Town Committee, and Albany-Dougherty Historic Preservation Commission.

The marker dedication will be held at the Hugh Shackelford House, 1801 Dawson Road in Albany. Jones designed the neoclassical-style home in 1948 for friends Hugh and Marie Shackelford. Jones drew inspiration for some of the elements in the home from Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello in Virginia. Attendees wishing to tour the Shackelford House may do so before the dedication begins from 4:30 – 5:00 p.m.

Historical Marker Dedication: Edward Vason Jones
Tuesday, April 24, 2018 at 5:00 p.m.
(Selected areas of the home will be open for viewing from
4:30 p.m. until 5:00 p.m.)

Hugh Shackelford House
1801 Dawson Road, Albany, Georgia 31707

The historical marker reads:

Edward Vason Jones

Edward Vason Jones, born in Albany on August 3, 1909, was a nationally recognized 20th-century classical architect and designer. Originally a student of dentistry at Northwestern University, Jones was a self-taught architect and began his career at the Atlanta architectural firm Hentz, Adler & Shutze. When the firm closed during World War II, Jones moved to Savannah to design ship hulls for the U.S. Navy. Following the war, Jones designed several notable structures, including Albany’s Hugh Shackelford House and the Albany-Dougherty Courthouse, and oversaw the restoration of the Mississippi Governor’s Mansion. Jones reached national renown when he restored interiors in the U.S. Department of State and the White House. Jones died in 1980 and is buried in Albany’s Oakview Cemetery. The entrance hall to the State Department diplomatic reception rooms in Washington, D.C. was renamed in his honor.

Erected by the Georgia Historical Society, The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Georgia – Albany Town Committee, and Albany-Dougherty Historic Preservation Commission.

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ABOUT THE GEORGIA HISTORICAL MARKER PROGRAM
The Georgia Historical Society (GHS) administers Georgia’s historical marker program. Over the past 20 years, GHS has erected over 250 new historical markers across the state on a wide variety of subjects. GHS also maintains the more than 2,100 markers installed by the State of Georgia prior to 1998. Online mapping tools allow users to design driving routes based on historical markers, and a mobile app helps visitors locate and learn about markers nearby.Visit georgiahistory.com for more ways to use Georgia’s historical markers and experience history where it happened.

ABOUT GEORGIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Georgia Historical Society (GHS) is the premier independent statewide institution responsible for collecting, examining, and teaching Georgia history. GHS houses the oldest and most distinguished collection of materials related exclusively to Georgia history in the nation.
To learn more visit georgiahistory.com.

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