Jasper Spring

Jasper Spring

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Photo credit to Carl Vinson Institute of Government.

Year Erected: 1957

Marker Text: On this spot, according to long and persistent tradition, occurred one of Sergeant William Jasper’s most famous exploits during the American Revolution. Here, in 1779, at the spring then located along the road to Augusta, Sergeant Jasper and Sergeant John Newton ambushed a detachment of ten British soldiers and liberated several Patriot prisoners who were being taken to Savannah.

While no contemporary confirmation of Jasper’s feat exists (it was first publicized by Parson Weems in 1809 in his Life of Gen. Francis Marion), the exploit was in every way characteristic of the immortal sergeant. An illustration of his courage and resourcefulness is found in the following item published in the Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg), May 15, 1779: “The brave serjeant Jasper . . . has lately given a new proof of his courage and address: He, with another serjeant, a few days ago, crossed the Savannah river, took, and brought to Major General Lincoln’s headquarters, two Captains, named Scott and Young, of the British troops in Georgia.”

Sergeant Jasper was mortally wounded, Oct. 9, 1779, while heroically bearing the colors of the 2nd South Carolina Continental Regiment in the assault on the British entrenchments at Savannah.

Tips for Finding This Site: At Augusta Ave. at I-516 in Savannah.