Malcolm Bell, Jr., and Muriel Barrow Bell Award

The Bell Award, established in 1992, is the highest publication award given by the Georgia Historical Society. It recognizes the best book on Georgia history published in the previous year. The award is named in honor of Malcolm Bell, Jr., and Muriel Barrow Bell in recognition of their contributions to the recording of Georgia’s history.


Nomination Information:

The deadline for submissions is January 31. Books submitted should be published between January 1 and December 31 of the previous calendar year. Four copies of the nominated books should be sent to the Georgia Historical Society at the address below. Nominated books cannot be returned. Only the winner will be notified in advance of the presentation of the award.

Nominations should include a cover page with the following information:

  • title of book
  • contact name, address, phone number, and email
  • date of publication

Please submit 4 copies of each book to:
Bell Award
The Georgia Historical Society
104 W. Gaston Street
Savannah, GA 31401


Previous Winners:

2016: Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South, by Dr. Talitha LeFlouria, published by University of North Carolina Press

2015: Dixie Highway: Road Building & the Making of the Modern South, 1900-1930, by Tammy Ingram, published by the University of North Carolina Press

2014: Johnny Mercer: Southern Songwriter for the World, by Glenn T. Eskew, published by the University of Georgia Press

2014: On the Rim of the Caribbean: Colonial Georgia and the British Atlantic World, by Paul Pressly, published by the University of Georgia Press

2013: Remaking Wormsloe Plantation: The Environmental History of a Lowcountry Landscape, by Drew Swanson, published by the University of Georgia Press

2012: Writing the South through the Self by John C. Inscoe, published by the University of Georgia Press in partnership with the Georgia Humanities Council

2011: African-American Life in the Georgia Lowcountry: The Atlantic World and the Gullah Geechee, edited by Philip Morgan, published by the University of Georgia Press

2010: What Virtue There is in Fire: Cultural Memory and the Lynching of Sam Hose, by Dr. Edwin Arnold, published by the University of Georgia Press

2009: Saving Savannah: The City and the Civil War, by Jacqueline Jones, published by Alfred A. Knopf

2008: Georgia’s Frontier Women: Female Fortunes in a Southern Colony, by Ben Marsh, published by University of Georgia Press

2007: White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism, by Kevin Kruse, published by Princeton University Press

2006: Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic, by Erskine Clarke, published by Yale University Press

2005: Okfuskee: A Creek Indian Town in Colonial America, by Joshua Piker, published by Harvard University Press

2004: And the Dead Shall Rise: The Murder of Mary Phagan and the Lynching of Leo Frank, by Steve Oney, published by Pantheon Books

2003: Highbrows, Hillbillies, and Hellfire: Public Entertainment in Atlanta, 1880-1930, by Steve Goodson, published by University of Georgia Press

2002: Beyond Atlanta: The Struggle for Racial Equality in Georgia, 1940-1980, by Stephen G.N. Tuck, published by University of Georgia Press

2001: Free Labor in an Unfree World: White Artisans in Slaveholding Georgia, 1789-1860, by Michele Gillespie, published by University of Georgia Press

2000: Secret Yankees: The Union Circle in Confederate Atlanta, by Thomas G. Dyer, published by Johns Hopkins University Press

1998-1999: Under the Guardianship of the Nation: The Freedmen’s Bureau and the Reconstruction of Georgia, 1865-1870, by Paul Cimbala, published by University of Georgia Press

1996-1997: Co-winners: The Temple Bombing, by Melissa Fay Green, published by Addison-Wesley, and “What Nature Suffers to Groe”: Life, Labor, and Landscape on the Georgia Coast, 1680-1920, by Mart Stewart, published by University of Georgia Press

1994-1995: Andersonville: The Last Depot, by William Marvel, published by University of North Carolina Press

1992-1993: Lachlan McGillivary, Indian Trader: The Shaping of the Southern Colonial Frontier, by Edward J. Cashin, published by University of Georgia Press