• Marker Monday: Cooper Pants Factory and the Gainesville Tornado

    This week GHS will highlight President Franklin Roosevelt’s impact on the state of Georgia in commemoration of the 75th anniversary of his death on April 12, 1945, at the Little White House in Warm Springs. We are starting with this week’s #MarkerMonday, looking at the Cooper Pants Factory and the Gainesville Tornado historical marker in Hall County. On this day (April 6) in 1936, two tornados traveled through Gainesville, leaving over 200 people dead, 1,600 injured, and 2,000 homeless. President Franklin Roosevelt visited Gainesville three days after the storm to assess the damage. He immediately worked with New Deal agencies to help rebuild the destroyed city.

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  • Marker Monday: Dr. Crawford W. Long and Anesthesia for Surgery

    In recognition of National Doctors’ Day (March 30), this week’s #MarkerMonday explores the Dr. Crawford W. Long and Anesthesia for Surgery historical marker in Jackson County. On this day in 1842, Dr. Crawford Long performed what is considered the first surgery using anesthesia. However, the first observance of National Doctors’ Day was not celebrated until March 30, 1933. Eudora Brown Almond, the wife of a doctor in Winder, Georgia, thought that her husband and other medical doctors deserved recognition for their work in healthcare. National Doctors’ Day became an official holiday in the United States in 1990.

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  • Marker Monday: World Record Bass

    This week’s #MarkerMonday looks at the World Record Bass historical marker in Telfair County. On June 2, 1932, George W. Perry caught a 22-pound, 4-ounce largemouth bass. The historical marker, placed in 1984, notes that the record had been retained to that point for more than fifty years, but the record still holds in the United States today, almost ninety years later. However, Manabu Kurita tied Perry’s record, according to the International Game Fish Association, with a largemouth bass caught in Japan in 2009. The bass earned Perry $75 of merchandise in Field and Stream Magazine’s fishing contest and led the magazine to begin cataloging world record fish. This record also led to the largemouth bass becoming Georgia’s Official State Fish in 1970.

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  • Marker Monday: St. Joseph’s Catholic Church

    This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights the St. Joseph’s Catholic Church historical marker in Bibb County and the tradition of celebrating St. Patrick’s Day in Georgia. The Irish community in Macon, Georgia, was established in the early 1800s, when Irish immigrants came seeking jobs in the expanding state. Irish Catholics in the area began meeting together in […]

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  • Marker Monday: Wheeler County

    This week’s #MarkerMonday looks at the Wheeler County historical marker to explore the history of the county’s namesake, Brigadier General Joseph “Fighting Joe” Wheeler. Although he served as a brigadier general for the Confederate cavalry of Tennessee during the Civil War and later became a congressman from Alabama after the war, he was born in Augusta, Georgia, in 1836. After promoting the start of the Spanish-American War in Congress, he enlisted with the United States Army when the war began in 1898.

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  • Marker Monday: Meson Academy

    This week’s #MarkerMonday looks at the Meson Academy historical marker in Oglethorpe County. The Meson Academy originally opened as a boys’ school in 1808 with funds left by Francis Meson, an Irish immigrant who became a wealthy merchant in Lexington, Georgia. He and other tradesmen took advantage of Lexington’s location on the route to Augusta to make profits. Upon his death, he left the executors of his will $8,000 for a new school. Over half of the money remained after building the school, but it was placed in an endowment, “to be used forever for the bene

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  • Marker Monday: Reed Bingham State Park Bridge

    In observance of Presidents’ Day, this week’s #MarkerMonday looks at the Reed Bingham State Park Bridge historical marker and its connection to President Jimmy Carter. Although the marker was erected after his inauguration as US President, the Georgia General Assembly created the marker to commemorate President Carter’s time as Governor of Georgia (1971-1975).

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  • Marker Monday: Atlanta Student Movement

    This week’s #MarkerMonday discusses the Atlanta Student Movement historical marker in commemoration of Black History Month. This marker can be found between Morehouse College, Spellman College, and Clark Atlanta University (formerly Atlanta University and Clark College), in Downtown Atlanta. As part of the Georgia Civil Rights Trail, this marker invites people to stand on the ground where struggles and events took place, so they may build and cultivate a deeper understanding of the past and its relevance to the present. Students from the three colleges surrounding the marker, along with students from the Interdenominational Theological Center and Morris Brown College, rallied together to form a non-violent protest against Jim Crow.

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  • Marker Monday: African-American Soldiers in Combat

    This week’s #MarkerMonday highlights the African American Soldiers in Combat historical marker in commemoration of Black History Month. This marker, part of the Civil War Historical Marker Initiative, is located in Whitfield County and tells the story of the 14th and 44th United States Colored Troops (USCT). This initiative was created to tell some of the previously untold stories of the war’s impact on civilians, politics, industry, the home front, African Americans, and women.

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  • Marker Monday: The Tonge Factory

    This week’s #MarkerMonday looks at The Tonge Factory historical marker in Decatur County, and its use during the Civil War. The textile mill was purchased by S. D. Tonge prior to the war and operated to provide cloth for use by the Confederate Army. This factory, along with others, provided materials for the army while also providing jobs for the home front.

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