• Marker Monday: Historic Tallapoosa

    This week’s #MarkerMonday examines the Historic Tallapoosa historical marker in Haralson County. Tallapoosa is about 60 miles west of Atlanta and located on the Georgia-Alabama border. When settlers first arrived in present-day Tallapoosa in 1826, they found a popular meeting ground for Choctaw, Creek, and Cherokee tribes. More settlers started to arrive during the Georgia gold rush (1829-1840s) when a local farmer, William Owens, found gold in 1842.

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  • Marker Monday: John Abbot (Screven County)

    This week’s #MarkerMonday examines the John Abbot historical marker in Screven County. As a naturalist,entomologist, and ornithologist, John Abbot (1751-c. 1840) spent his life studying nature, insects, and birds. He is particularly known for his detailed drawings of birds and lepidopterous insects, the class of insects including butterflies and moths. While he lived in England, he was introduced to Dru Drury, a jeweler with an interest in entomology. Drury coordinated naturalist expeditions to England’s colonies, and inspired Abbot to travel to the colony of Virginia in July of 1773.

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  • Marker Monday: Boys Estate (Elizafield Plantation)

    This week’s #MarkerMonday examines the Boys Estate (Elizafield Plantation) historical marker in Glynn County. In the early 19th century, Elizafield Plantation operated as a rice and sugar plantation under Dr. Robert Grant. In 1833, the plantation was passed to Dr. Grant’s son, Hugh Fraser Grant. After evacuating during the Civil War, the Grant family moved to Savannah and Elizafield Plantation fell into disrepair. By 1935, the former Elizafield Plantation was managed by Cator Woolford, who deeded 350 acres to the state for the development of a new state park.

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  • Marker Monday: Warm Springs Treatment Pools

    This week’s #MarkerMonday examines the Warm Springs Treatment Pools historical marker in Meriwether County. The natural springs of Warm Springs are the largest and most famous springs in Georgia. You may be familiar with President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s use of the pools as a treatment for his polio symptoms—it is believed that natural hot springs hold therapeutic benefits. After FDR founded the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation in 1927, the springs were transformed into a hydrotherapeutic treatment center to alleviate the debilitating effects of polio.

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  • Marker Monday: Griswoldville

    This week’s #MarkerMonday looks at the Griswoldville historical marker in Jones County. This historical marker is one of several that follow the history of the Battle of Griswoldville. The battle took place on November 22, 1864, two days after Sherman’s Right Wing destroyed the small factory village of Griswoldville. As Confederate Brigadier General P.J. Phillips […]

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  • Marker Monday: Bacon County

    This week’s #MarkerMonday looks at the Bacon County Historical Marker to tell the history of an important industry in Bacon County. Bacon County was founded in 1914 as the 151st county in Georgia. Bacon County received its name in honor of Augustus Octavius Bacon, a four- term US Senator who also served as President Pro Tempore in 1912. Alma, the only incorporated town within county lines, became the county seat. Today, Alma is known as the Blueberry Capital of Georgia, and each year it hosts the Annual Blueberry Festival to signify the importance of the blueberry crop in Bacon County and in Georgia.

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  • Marker Monday: Montgomery County

    This week’s #MarkerMonday looks at the Montgomery County historical marker and its namesake. Montgomery County was originally made up of present-day Wheeler and Tattnall counties and parts of Treutlen, Toombs, Emanuel and Dodge counties when it was created on December 19, 1793. Named after Major General Richard Montgomery, the county was settled primarily by former Revolutionary War veterans who received land grants.

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  • Marker Monday: The Taylor-Grady House

    This week’s #MarkerMonday explores The Taylor-Grady House historical marker in Clarke County and one of its residents. Robert Taylor built the house as a summer home, but his family moved there permanently when his three sons enrolled at the University of Georgia. They owned the house until 1863 when it was purchased by Major William S. Grady. Major Grady died in the Battle of Petersburg during the Civil War before he could move his family into the house. However, Major Grady’s son, Henry Woodfin Grady, moved into the house with his mother in 1865 when he enrolled at UGA.

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  • Marker Monday: Battle of the Blankets

    This week’s #MarkerMonday looks at the Battle of the Blankets historical marker in Worth County. In 1702, when most of today’s south Georgia and northern Florida was contested ground between Spain, England, and France and between rival groups of Native Americans, a small battle along the Flint River played an outsized role in bringing one of Europe’s most significant conflicts of the early eighteenth century into the Southeast of America. Responding to a request for support from Appalachee Indians in northern Florida, Spanish governor José de Zúñiga sent soldiers to aid the Appalachee in their conflict with the Apalachicola (part of the Creek Nation) and their English allies. As the Appalachees and Spanish made their way toward the Flint River in today’s Worth County, the Apalachicola learned of their approach and prepared for the attack.

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  • Marker Monday: “The Thicket,” Sugar Mill & Rum Distillery Ruins

    This week’s #MarkerMonday examines the history of sugar and rum production in Georgia by looking at “The Thicket,” Sugar Mill & Rum Distillery Ruins historical marker in McIntosh County. William Carnochan’s plantation, known as “The Thicket,” operated from 1816 to 1824 as a sugar mill and rum distillery. It was modeled after Thomas Spalding’s sugar production plantation on Sapelo Island.

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