Teaching the Civil Rights Movement with the Georgia Historical Marker Program

The Georgia Historical Society's Teaching the Civil Rights Movement with the Georgia Historical Marker Program teacher training course was held January through March of 2022. Open to educators across Georgia, this training opportunity was made possible by the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) Eastern Region Program coordinated by Waynesburg University.

 

Throughout the Teaching the Civil Rights Movement with the Georgia Historical Marker Program teacher training course, participants constructed Focused Inquiries based on the Inquiry Design Model. Each inquiry is a standards-based (GSE) investigation of the struggle for civil and human rights in Georgia. Featuring historical markers from the Georgia Historical Marker Program’s Georgia Civil Rights Trail and primary sources from GHS and the Library of Congress, these inquiries enhance student understanding of an era in which religion, education, politics, and free enterprise intersected to end Jim Crow and secure civil rights for African Americans. Use these classroom-ready investigations to explore local, state, and national stories from Reconstruction through the late twentieth century in elementary and middle school classrooms.

A Focused Inquiry is an adaptation of the Inquiry Design Model from C3 Teachers. The Inquiry Design Model (IDM) is a distinctive approach to creating curriculum and instructional materials that honors teachers’ knowledge and expertise, avoids overprescription, and focuses on the main elements of the instructional design process as envisioned in the Inquiry Arc of the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards (2013). (C3teachers.org).

Focused Inquiries:

 

Albany Movement Georgia Historical Marker (Dougherty County) focused inquiry

By Jennifer Egas, Georgia Virtual Academy


Alonzo Herndon Georgia Historical Marker (Fulton County) focused inquiry

By Sade Stanton, Crystal Flowers, and Samantha Bazzell-Oliver, Fulton County Schools


Atlanta Student Movement Georgia Historical Marker (Fulton County) focused inquiry

By Paul DeBacher, The Children’s School


Primus King and the Civil Rights Movement Georgia Historical Marker (Muscogee County) focused inquiry

By Cathy Paige, Marietta City Schools and Tracy Wiley, GPB Education


Slave Cabins Georgia Historical Marker (Glynn County) focused inquiry

By Carl Parke, The Children’s School


Leesburg Stockade Georgia Historical Marker (Lee County) focused inquiry

By Lisa Landers and Elyse Butler, Georgia Historical Society


Leesburg Stockade Georgia Historical Marker (Lee County) focused inquiry

By Ann B. Canning, Ed.D, TPS Eastern Region

Project Information:

The Teaching the Civil Rights Movement with the Georgia Historical Marker Program teacher training course will equip pairs of elementary and middle level educators to better teach Georgia and American history by utilizing the informational texts of the Georgia Historical Marker Program, promoting increased use of primary sources from GHS and the Library of Congress, and disseminating effective teaching with primary sources inquiry-based strategies.

The ten-week course will guide participants to create lessons based on the Inquiry Design Model using primary sources to explore the Georgia Historical Marker Program's Civil Rights Trail so students can better understand the struggle, impact, and nuance of the Civil Rights Movement in Georgia and the United States. GHS will share classroom strategies for using the Georgia Historical Marker Program and primary sources from the collections of the Library of Congress and the Georgia Historical Society to teach the American Civil Rights Movement. Content for the course will be delivered through a combination of self-paced activities, including readings and assignments, and weekly one-hour online meetings for participants to collaborate, discuss, and learn from course instructors.

Course Instructors:

  • Lisa Landers, Education Manager at the Georgia Historical Society
  • Elyse Butler, Marker Manager at the Georgia Historical Society
  • Dr. Stan Deaton, the Dr. Elaine B. Andrews Distinguished Historian at the Georgia Historical Society
  • Ann Canning, Instructor with Teaching with Primary Sources, Eastern Region at Waynesburg University
  • Glenn Eskew, Distinguished University Professor at Georgia State University Department of History
  • Michele Celani, educational consultant and retired social studies educator in Georgia
  • Corey Rogers, Historian at the Lucy Craft Laney Museum and former classroom teacher in Georgia

Course registration:

Registration form: Georgia Historical Society Submittable

Partner and administrative agreement form to be signed by all participants.

Project Goals:

Participants will learn inquiry-based strategies for teaching the Civil Rights Movement through the Georgia Historical Marker Program's Civil Rights Trail and primary sources from the collections of the Library of Congress and the Georgia Historical Society. Throughout the course participants will utilize what they learn to create and publish teaching units featuring project-based activities based on the Inquiry Design Model.

Participants will be required to complete one to two hours of independent learning activities in preparation for each week’s one-hour live collaborative meeting.

Each week participants will explore creating inquiry-based lessons utilizing primary sources and Georgia Historical Markers. Some of the major weekly themes include:

  • Finding and using primary sources from the collections of the Library of Congress and GHS.
  • Utilizing inquiry-based strategies for primary source analysis.
  • Forming a historical inquiry based on the Inquiry Design Model.
  • Conducting historical research and developing evidenced-based arguments.
  • Develop project-based learning activities with primary sources and historical markers.
  • Exploring the Georgia Historical Marker Program's Civil Rights Trail through the online Historical Maker Database.
  • Understand the history, purpose, and scope of the Georgia Historical Marker Program by evaluating the evolution of historical writing and interpretation.
  • Utilize literacy strategies for reading, writing, and analyzing historical makers.
  • Explore bias, difficult histories, and the limits of historical research.
  • Explore how historical markers relate to the context of its geographic location, explore dialogues between different historical markers in the Civil Rights Trail, and learn how markers differ from historical monuments or memorials.
  • Utilize the TPS Teachers Network, the Inquiry Design Model, and other relevant educational resources to support creating historical inquiries for the classroom.

Dates of course:

Week of January 17, 2022 – Week of March 21, 2022, with the weekly live, web-based meetings every Tuesday from 3:00-4:00.

Who can participate:

In order to foster collaboration and sustainability, participants in this course will be required to work in pairs. Participants can choose their partner who can be an educator from the same school or school system and can include teachers, administrators, and specialists. Participants must submit a completed partner and administrative agreement form signed by both participants confirming their commitment to the ten-week course.

Eligible participants will include, but are not limited to, fifth and eighth grade classroom teachers, elementary and middle school administrators, media specialists, and curriculum specialists. The Georgia Standards of Excellence for fifth and eighth grades cover the last third of United States history including the Civil Rights Movement. Focusing on educators who teach these standards allows for the best use of the marker program and primary sources from the Library of Congress to help teach local, state, and national history.

Time commitment:

Using a flipped class model, each week participants will to complete one to two hours of independent learning activities in preparation for each week’s one-hour live collaborative meeting. Participants must be able to attend weekly web-based meetings.

Course registration:

Please note the registration form will go live on September 1, 2021.

Registration form: Georgia Historical Society Submittable

Partner and administrative agreement form to be signed by all participants.


Who is eligible to participate in the teacher training course?

The teacher training course will host twelve pairs of educators resulting in 24 participants. The course will be open to registrants on a first-come, first-served basis who meet the eligibility requirements. Public, private, parochial, or homeschool educators in Georgia who are elementary or middle school teachers, administrators, media/literacy staff, or curriculum specialists and teach the United States Civil Rights Movement and/or Georgia Studies are eligible to register for the course. All registrants must have a partner (who also meets the course eligibility) to participate.


How do I register for the training course?

Please note the registration form will go live on September 1, 2021. Complete the online registration form through Submittable. Your registration must include a signed partner and administrative agreement form. One team member may register for both pairs, however, a completed participation form must be included with signatures from both team members and an administrator.


How do I use Submittable to submit my application?

Follow the link from the Georgia Historical Society’s website to access the application. Once there, simply create a free account with your email address. If you have a preexisting Submittable account a new account is not needed. From that point, you will be able to complete the participant application.


When and where does the training course take place?

The teacher training course will be held online through a learning management system. Participants should anticipate spending a total of 2-3 hours of time per week, for both independent learning activities and a weekly 1-hour online meeting.

Course Dates: Week of January 17, 2022 – Week of March 21, 2022, with the weekly meeting day and time TBD.


How much does it cost to participate?

The teacher training course is free to participants and will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Weekly 1-hour meetings will take place in afternoons during after-school hours and should not require hiring a substitute.


What can I expect to learn?

Participants will learn inquiry-based strategies for using the Civil Rights Trail of the Georgia Historical Marker Program along with primary sources from the collections of the Library of Congress and the Georgia Historical Society to teach the American Civil Rights Movement and create lessons featuring project-based activities designed with the Inquiry Design Model.

For major course themes see "Project Goals" under "Guidelines and Registration."


How do I complete the course?

Throughout the course, participants will learn how to build an inquiry-based lesson plan based on the Inquiry Design Model (IDM). Each week participants will build their knowledge and understanding to practice inquiry strategies in their classrooms and design activities for students to explore markers on the Georgia Historical Marker Program's Civil Rights Trail and primary sources from the Library of Congress and the Georgia Historical Society. Each participant who completes the course by submitting their final lesson based on the Inquiry Design Model will receive a certificate of completion confirming fulfillment of 20 professional development hours.


What is the Georgia Historical Society?

Georgia Historical Society (GHS) is the premier independent statewide institution responsible for collecting, examining, and teaching Georgia history. GHS houses the oldest and most distinguished collection of materials related exclusively to Georgia history in the nation. Founded in 1839, the Georgia Historical Society is the oldest continuously operated historical society in the South.


What is Teaching with Primary Sources?

Since 2006, the Library of Congress has awarded Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) grants to build a nationwide network of organizations that deliver educational programming, and create teaching materials and tools based on the Library’s digitized primary sources and other online resources. Each year members of this network, called the TPS Consortium, support tens of thousands of learners to build knowledge, engagement, and critical thinking skills with items from the Library’s collections.


What is the Inquiry Design Model?

The Inquiry Design Model (IDM) is a distinctive approach to creating curriculum and instructional materials that honors teachers’ knowledge and expertise, avoids overprescription, and focuses on the main elements of the instructional design process as envisioned in the Inquiry Arc of the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards (2013).

Examples of historical inquiries based on the Inquiry Design Model created by GHS.


What is the Georgia Historical Marker Program?

The Georgia Historical Society (GHS) administers Georgia’s historical marker program. Over the past 20 years, GHS has erected nearly 300 new historical markers across the state on a wide variety of subjects. GHS also coordinates the maintenance for more than 2,100 markers installed by the State of Georgia prior to 1998. Online mapping tools allow users to design driving routes based on historical markers, and a mobile app helps visitors locate and learn about markers nearby. Visit georgiahistory.com/markers for more ways to use Georgia’s historical markers and experience history where it happened.


What is the Georgia Civil Rights Trail?

In commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the beginning of the modern Civil Rights Movement in Georgia, the Georgia Historical Society embarked upon a new, statewide public education initiative that employs a unique and enduring educational and economic development tool – historical markers – while also leveraging existing technology and online resources to enhance the public’s understanding of an era in which religion, education, politics, and free enterprise intersected to create a successful movement that ended Jim Crow and secured civil rights for African Americans. Recognizing that the struggle for civil and human rights began long before the mid-twentieth-century Movement, the Civil Rights Trail includes historical markers that explore stories from Reconstruction through the late twentieth century.

Georgia Historical Marker Program's Civil Rights Trail


But I still have more questions...

Contact GHS Outreach Assistant Sabrina Saturday at ssaturday@georgiahistory.com for more information.

Historical Marker Program

Marker Programs Page ImageThe Georgia Historical Society has administered Georgia’s statewide marker program since 1998, erecting nearly 300 historical markers across Georgia on a wide variety of subjects. Today those markers and over two thousand others erected during earlier chapters in the state’s marker program are available here through a searchable database. Roadside historical markers capture Georgia history in a format readily understood by travelers and residents alike. These easily identifiable markers give readers a unique insight into the stories of our shared past. The search tools allow users to access information on markers in all parts of Georgia and even create travel routes to view markers based on individual interests such as Georgia in the Civil War or the Civil Rights Movement and can experience history where it happened. Learn more.


Library of Congress and Teaching with Primary Sources

Marker Programs Page ImageThe Library of Congress awards grants to a wide variety of organizations, including K-12 schools, universities, literacy organizations, centers, clubs, historical societies, museums, libraries, associations of home-schooling parents and care-givers, honor societies, and other community, civic, professional, state, regional, and national groups that expand the body of innovative strategies, tools, and materials for meaningful teaching and learning with Library of Congress materials. Learn more.

 


The Inquiry Design Model (IDM) is a distinctive approach to creating curriculum and instructional materials that honors teachers’ knowledge and expertise, avoids overprescription, and focuses on the main elements of the instructional design process as envisioned in the Inquiry Arc of the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards (2013). Unique to the IDM is the blueprint, a one-page representation of the questions, tasks, and sources that define a curricular inquiry.

 


Project Partners

Georgia Historical Society

Georgia Historical Society (GHS) is the premier independent statewide institution responsible for collecting, examining, and teaching Georgia history. GHS houses the oldest and most distinguished collection of materials related exclusively to Georgia history in the nation.


Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources

The Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) Eastern Region program at Waynesburg University supports K-12 education by offering free professional development and resources to educators across the Eastern Region.

The mission of the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources program is to build awareness of the Library's educational initiatives, provide content that promotes the effective educational use of the Library's resources, and offer access to and promote sustained use of the Library's educational resources.

The Library achieves this mission through collaborations between the Library and the K-12 educational community across the United States. The program contributes to the quality of education by helping teachers use the Library's digitized primary sources to engage students, develop their critical thinking skills, and construct knowledge. Learn more about the Library's TPS program and other resources available to teachers via the Teachers Page.


This program is sponsored in part by the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Eastern Region Program, coordinated by Waynesburg University.