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Georgia Historical Society Unveils New Historical Marker Recognizing the Savannah Beach Wade-Ins of the 1960s

The Honorable Edna Jackson, Georgia House of Representatives and former Mayor of Atlanta

Savannah, GA, August 18, 2022 – On August 17, 2022, the Georgia Historical Society, in conjunction with the Tybee MLK Human Rights Organization and the City of Tybee Island, dedicated a new historical marker about the Savannah Beach wade-ins of the 1960s.

“The Georgia Historical Society is pleased to add the Savannah Beach Wade-Ins historical marker to the Georgia Civil Rights Trail,” said GHS Marker Manager Elyse Butler. “The historical marker illustrates how segregationist policies impacted every facet of life for African Americans. It shows how the fight for equal access to public accommodation was not limited to department store lunch counters, but also included outdoor spaces like parks, swimming pools, and in this case the beach.”

During the era of segregation, African Americans were denied access to Savannah’s Beach, Tybee Island, and were forced to travel outside the city for public beach access. On August 17, 1960, eleven African-American students were arrested on Tybee Island at Georgia’s first wade-in protesting the Whites-only public beaches.

“The wade-ins deserve recognition because they help us realize that these events are an important part of Tybee’s history—a history that isn’t always remembered,” said Pat Leiby of the Tybee MLK Human Rights Organization. “It’s so important that the community has the knowledge that this tiny place was so significant as part if the larger Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.”

The dedication took place at the Walter Park Pier and Pavilion on Tybee Island. In attendance were Dr. Todd Groce, President and CEO of the Georgia Historical Society; Julia Pearce, Tybee MLK Human Rights Organization; the Honorable Shirley Sessions, Mayor of the City of Tybee Island; Allen Lewis, Vice President of the Tybee Island Historical Society and Co-Chair of the Dedication Committee; Charick Mance, Founder of the Mance Law Firm and President of the Savannah Chapter of the NAACP; Dr. Otis Johnson, former Mayor of Savannah; and the Honorable Edna Jackson, Georgia House of Representatives District 165 and former Mayor of Savannah.

Representative Jackson gave the keynote address. She participated in the original wade-ins.

The marker text reads:

Savannah Beach Wade-Ins

On August 17, 1960, eleven African-American students were arrested six blocks north of here at Georgia’s first wade-in protesting the Whites-only public beaches. During the era of segregation, Savannah’s African Americans were forced to travel outside of the city for public beach access. NAACP Executive Secretary Roy Wilkins announced the wade-in as a desegregation tactic for public beaches following the April 1960 wade-in at Biloxi, Mississippi, where an angry White mob attacked protestors. An extension of the Savannah Movement, the Savannah Beach wade-ins were planned and implemented by the local NAACP Youth Council under the leadership of W. W. Law. The last wade-in at Savannah Beach was in July 1963. Savannah Beach and the city’s other public places were integrated by October 1963, eight months before the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Erected by the Georgia Historical Society, Tybee MLK Human Rights Organization, and the City of Tybee Island

To learn more about the Savannah Beach wade-ins historical marker, please contact Keith Strigaro, Director of Communications at the Georgia Historical Society, at 912-651-2125 ext. 153 or kstrigaro@georgiahistory.com.

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ABOUT THE GEORGIA HISTORICAL MARKER PROGRAM
Georgia Historical Society (GHS) administers Georgia’s historical marker program. Over the past 20 years, GHS has erected nearly 300 new historical markers across the state on a wide variety of subjects. GHS also coordinates the maintenance for more than 2,100 markers installed by the State of Georgia prior to 1998. Online mapping tools allow users to design driving routes based on historical markers, and a mobile app helps visitors locate and learn about markers nearby. Visit georgiahistory.com for more ways to use Georgia’s historical markers and experience history where it happened.

ABOUT THE GEORGIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Georgia Historical Society (GHS) is the premier independent statewide institution responsible for collecting, examining, and teaching Georgia history. GHS houses the oldest and most distinguished collection of materials related exclusively to Georgia history in the nation.
To learn more visit georgiahistory.com.