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Georgia Historical Society Virtually Dedicates New Civil Rights Trail Historical Marker for Hart County Training School

Left to Right: Dr. Elizabeth Davis, University of Georgia English Department, Dr. Nathaniel Clark, President, Hart County Training School Historical Recognition Sponsor Group Inc., Mr. Jaybez Floyd, Superintendent, Hart County Charter System, after presentation on Rosenwald Schools at dedication ceremony. Photo Credit: Rosanna Cruz Bibb, Program Coordinator /Archway Partnership

November 5, 2020, Savannah, GA – The Georgia Historical Society today announced the virtual dedication of a new Georgia Civil Rights Trail historical marker for Hart County Training School in Hartwell, Georgia.

In keeping with safety protocols relating to COVID-19, the marker was dedicated in a small private ceremony in October. The virtual dedication continues throughout this week through a series of blog posts available on all GHS social media platforms and on the web.

“From 1924 to 1970 all African-American children in Hart County attended the Hart County Training School, but there was nothing to inform the public that it ever existed other than the building, now home to the Hart County Head Start,” said Dr. Nathaniel Clark, President of Hart County Training School Historical Recognition Sponsor Group, Inc. Board of Directors. “By placing this marker, we are preserving the rich history of our beloved school and telling the story of the huge impact it had on the lives of African Americans in Hart County and beyond.”

The marker was erected by the Georgia Historical Society, Hart County Historical Society, Hart County Training School Historical Recognition Sponsor Group, and Hart County Charter System and is located at 500 North Richardson Street in Hartwell, Georgia, in front of the entrance to Hart County Head Start.

For more information about the Hart County Training School historical marker you can follow the Georgia Historical Society on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn. For more information about the Georgia Historical Society Historical Marker Program please contact Pattye Meagher, GHS Director of Communications, at pmeagher@georgiahistory.com or by cell at 434.996.7085.

The marker reads:

Hart County Training School

Hart County Training School (HCTS), established in 1924 for the education of African-American children, was partially funded by the Rosenwald School Building Program. This program matched funds from philanthropist Julius Rosenwald with community donations to build schools for African Americans during the era of segregation. HCTS was one of several African-American schools in Hart County at the time and is an early example of the public consolidated school system, which allowed for multiple grades to be housed in one facility. Rebuilt in 1955 as an equalization school, part of a statewide effort to improve school buildings and preserve segregation, HCTS became the only public school for black students in Hart County. In 1970 the county integrated the school system, and HCTS was renamed Hart County Junior High School.

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ABOUT GEORGIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Georgia Historical Society (GHS) is the premier independent statewide institution responsible for collecting, examining, and teaching Georgia history. GHS houses the oldest and most distinguished collection of materials related exclusively to Georgia history in the nation.
To learn more visit georgiahistory.com.


ABOUT THE GEORGIA HISTORICAL MARKER PROGRAM
The Georgia Historical Society (GHS) administers Georgia’s historical marker program. Over the past 20 years, GHS has erected nearly 300 new historical markers across the state on a wide variety of subjects. GHS also coordinates the maintenance for more than 2,100 markers installed by the State of Georgia prior to 1998. Online mapping tools allow users to design driving routes based on historical markers, and a mobile app helps visitors locate and learn about markers nearby. Visit georgiahistory.com for more ways to use Georgia’s historical markers and experience history where it happened.